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Championship Productions Featured Items!

older | 1 | .... | 4 | 5 | (Page 6)

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    with Russ Rose, Penn State University Head Coach;
    2014 NCAA Champions; back-to-back NCAA Championship Coach (2013-14);
    four consecutive NCAA Championships (2010, 2009, 2008, 2007) and seven overall;
    5x AVCA National Coach of the Year, over 1000 career coaching victories,
    recognized by USA Volleyball as one of their All-Time Great Coaches in 2005

    Get an inside look at training powerful hitters from one of the most successful coaches in NCAA women's volleyball history. Starting with the approach and swing and finishing with competitive team drills, coaching legend Russ Rose shows you how to get the best out of your outside hitters.

    Characteristics of an Outside Hitter
    Coach Rose begins with expectations for outside hitters and what they need to do on the court to be successful. His philosophy will provide you with a blueprint for developing great outside hitters.

    Passing and Hitting Drills
    Coach Rose showcases a series of drills that enable outside hitters to practice the movement patterns they need to master to be successful. Coach Rose shows you how to adjust the drill to see how movement patterns change based on where the ball is served. As the drill progresses, defenders and blockers are added and scoring is added to make the training more game-like.

    Blocking and Hitting Drills
    This set of drills, which includes tip coverage to attack, digging to attack and blocking to attack, gives players opportunities to block from both the left side and middle before transitioning to a good attack position. Players are trained to work hard to get a big swing coming off the block.

    Drills for Hitting Out of System
    Out-of-system drills offer the opportunity for players other than setters to practice setting the ball to outside hitters. These drills also teach hitters how to adjust for an out-of-system ball.

    Competitive Drills
    One of most beneficial drill segments in the presentation is this series of competitive drills. These drills use scoring systems to push players to compete. Coach Rose has outside hitters battle head-to-head in 6v6 games. These mini-games are scored to seven points, but only one player from each side can be set during the game. You'll see many different iterations of this drill including OH vs OH, RS vs RS, and back row attacker vs back row attacker.

    Another competitive drill is played 5v5 with no middles. Only pin hitters and pipe attackers can attack in this drill. Hitters learn how to take advantage of solo blocks, players learn how to block solo when necessary, and everyone learns how to defend when the block is not perfect.

    Conditioning for Hitters
    All of these drills feature multiple attacks and game-like contacts in rapid succession. Though conditioning is certainly a big part of these drills, Coach Rose designs them as volleyball drills first; the conditioning is just a result of the pace of the contacts.

    Coach Rose gives you numerous drills that you can start using in your gym immediately. In addition, his observation on the different roles an outside hitter must master might change how you evaluate players in the future.

    56 minutes. 2015.


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    with Bre Johnson,
    Marshall (MI) High School Head Coach

    As anyone who has coached beginner volleyball to young players knows, keeping the attention of the players is job number one. Bre Johnson understands what it takes to teach youth volleyball to all skill levels.

    In this video, Coach Johnson demonstrates how to teach basic skills to players as young as 5 years old, as well as older players that are just taking up the sport of volleyball. She demonstrate drills to train players on how to pass, set, hit, block and serve. What makes her coaching style so effective is that, while breaking down the skill, she uses fun terms for each of the physical movements of a skill so that players can remember the progression of each skill.

    Dynamic Warm-up and Movement Drills

    Incorporate dynamic warm-up exercises for your youth players. Johnson goes through different warm-up options that you can implement in your practice, from hand eye coordination to footwork. She does a great job at making the drills both fun and effective in order to keep younger players engaged while they warm up.

    Platform Training

    Johnson illustrates the proper form that is required for passing and teaches players to remember by using "fun terms" while teaching this skill. Once the platform has been taught, she progresses to a number of progressive passing drills that teach how to shuffle while keeping the platform static.

    Four Points of Setting

    The basics of setting are taught to youth players using Johnson's "four points of setting" that are belly button, five head, finish and follow-through. As with all the other skills, Johnson progresses with a number of drills so that the players can get plenty of reps while learning the skill.

    Coach Johnson does a wonderful job of teaching the basic fundamentals of volleyball in a fun and energetic way so that young players can learn and stay focused!

    Produced at the 2016 AVCA Annual Convention in Columbus, OH.

    55 minutes. 2017.


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    with Christy Johnson-Lynch,
    Iowa State University Head Coach;
    2009 Asics/Volleyball Magazine National Coach of the Year;2009 AVCA Central Region Coach of the Year;2009 Big 12 Coach of the Year;
    2011 & 2008 Elite Eight appearances; Coached 9 of the past 10 years 'Big XII Libero of the Year' award winners

    The coach of 9 of the past 10 Big XII 'Libero of the Year' winners, Iowa State's Christy Johnson-Lynch, shares her thoughts on selecting and utilizing your libero and demonstrates drills with her own players. She gives suggestions on how to allow your best passers, including your libero, to get touches on more balls, and, how to be more active during a game.

    This video will help you understand the key skills in your defenders so you can select your libero, in addition to giving you a clear understanding on how to utilize that libero to maximum effectiveness.

    Libero Strategies

    Johnson-Lynch discusses strategy and rationale to determine if you should place your libero in the left back or middle back positions, including topics such as the libero setting the second ball when out of system. Additionally, she provides thoughts on how to adjust serve receive to take advantage of a strong passer while also keeping your strong hitters in the best position to attack the ball.

    Drills for Improving the Skill Set

    Johnson-Lynch has her players demonstrate the development of defensive skills in seven drills as she explains the strategy and focus of each drill. She discusses how to work on individual defensive skills in addition to ways to get more touches from your best defender when the opponent is trying to avoid them. Also covered are out of system drills that train your libero to handle the second ball when your setter has made the initial pass.

    Develop Attitude, Grit, and Intensity

    You will see how to create more aggressive and responsive defensive players. By stepping away from purely game-like drills, Johnson-Lynch explains how drills that focus on speed and reactive skills can create defenders with more attitude, grit and intensity. These mental traits are vital for enhancing your overall team defense as well as helping you develop and train your libero to dominate on the court.

    Throughout this entire video, Johnson-Lynch provides observations, insights and drills to enhance your libero's overall skills, including both physical and mental attributes, to become a stronger defender. She demonstrates these skills in simple-to-execute drills and provides strategies for using your best defender.

    The skills you'll learn in this video are critical for developing a dominant libero!

    48 minutes. 2018.


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    with Bre Johnson,
    Marshall (MI) High School Head Coach

    As anyone who has coached beginner volleyball to young players knows, keeping the attention of the players is job number one. Bre Johnson understands what it takes to teach youth volleyball to all skill levels.

    In this video, Coach Johnson demonstrates how to teach basic skills to players as young as 5 years old, as well as older players that are just taking up the sport of volleyball. She demonstrate drills to train players on how to pass, set, hit, block and serve. What makes her coaching style so effective is that, while breaking down the skill, she uses fun terms for each of the physical movements of a skill so that players can remember the progression of each skill.

    Dynamic Warm-up and Movement Drills

    Incorporate dynamic warm-up exercises for your youth players. Johnson goes through different warm-up options that you can implement in your practice, from hand eye coordination to footwork. She does a great job at making the drills both fun and effective in order to keep younger players engaged while they warm up.

    Platform Training

    Johnson illustrates the proper form that is required for passing and teaches players to remember by using "fun terms" while teaching this skill. Once the platform has been taught, she progresses to a number of progressive passing drills that teach how to shuffle while keeping the platform static.

    Four Points of Setting

    The basics of setting are taught to youth players using Johnson's "four points of setting" that are belly button, five head, finish and follow-through. As with all the other skills, Johnson progresses with a number of drills so that the players can get plenty of reps while learning the skill.

    Coach Johnson does a wonderful job of teaching the basic fundamentals of volleyball in a fun and energetic way so that young players can learn and stay focused!

    Produced at the 2016 AVCA Annual Convention in Columbus, OH.

    55 minutes. 2017.


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    YVD-04346A:

    with Kevin Hambly,
    Stanford University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA National Champions!;
    2018 Pac-12 Volleyball Coach of the Year,
    2018 AVCA Pacific North Region Coach of the Year;
    former University of Illinois Head Coach;
    2011 NCAA Runners-up; 2011 Volleyball Magazine Coach of the Year

    Are you looking for a simple method to break down the art of setting to teach your setter? This is the video you will want to pick up.

    In this volume of Kevin Hambly's coach-, player-, and parent-friendly series, he teaches how the key components of being a successful setter can be taught, learned and practiced. Coach Hambly has an experienced college setter demonstrate balanced, efficient posture and movements then walks a less experienced player through how to execute the same "Go Posture" and technique.

    Some of the essentials for successful setting at any level include:

    • Beginning in a balanced, neutral "Go Posture"
    • Facing the action of the ball before making the set
    • Using whole hands to contact the ball (not just fingers)
    • Using body torque to generate setting power
    • Finishing palms (not fingers) to the target

    This video covers every aspect of setting technique from how to fundamentally prepare for the ball, move to the ball, and contact the ball to how to handle more difficult, out-of-system, realistic match play situations such as:

    • Back setting
    • Pass setting
    • Tempo Setting
    • High Ball Setting
    • Setting out of the bottom of the net
    • Setting out from the top of the net

    Your setter touches nearly one out of every ball on your side, wouldn't you want those to be good touches? Coach Hambly's instruction makes it easy for your setter to check themselves on each component. Hambly teaches your setter to set at a college caliber level, no matter what their age.

    75 minutes. 2013.



    YVD-04346B:

    with Kevin Hambly,
    Stanford University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA National Champions!;
    2018 Pac-12 Volleyball Coach of the Year,
    2018 AVCA Pacific North Region Coach of the Year;
    former University of Illinois Head Coach;
    2011 NCAA Runners-up; 2011 Volleyball Magazine Coach of the Year

    Kevin Hambly presents his method of teaching beginning athletes the fundamentals of a powerful attack. He breaks the attack down into a natural progression of skills, which gives coaches of any level, as well as parents or fellow athletes, the steps they need to develop solid hitting skills.

    Coach Hambly covers the skill of hitting with focus on the arm-swing, approach, and vertical jump. He uses some of his college players to demonstrate his detailed progressions for teaching hitting, and then he teaches younger players to execute the same safe, aggressive hitting movements. Listening to Hambly's teaching points as he corrects the young athletes will help you know how to help your aspiring volleyball players.

    In teaching an effective attack from start to finish or movement, Hambly walks his players through a progression of movements in which each step builds on the previously learned technique. His progression involves putting the following steps together:

    • Throwing
    • Attacking from the ground
    • Working vertical movement
    • Approaching to attack

    His drill progressions show great insight into the bio-mechanics of the swing and how to train players to perfect the motions. See how he uses tennis balls to help players get the hang of the swing mechanics without having to worry about the timing of hitting a ball. The use of the throwing technique and tennis balls in Hambly's drills really help athletes get the feel for the motion of the swing. He shows some great drills that can be used to work on all of the keys to hitting and goes into great depth on how to toss and when to toss for each drill.

    After arm swing is covered, athletes begin to work on their approach, taking their horizontal movement and turning it into vertical. You will learn why the last two steps are so important in transferring movement to vertical. Hambly focuses on slow to fast efficient movement, removing any unnecessary motion. The video finishes with the slide approach which Hambly explains is a great skill for more experienced players.

    As he takes both levels of athletes through the progressions, one skill is focused on at a time. This singular focus really allows the athletes to fine tune one skill before moving on. Even after moving to the next layer, Hambly only stresses the current skill being taught. Revisiting these skills over and over will develop the consistency a high level athlete needs.

    At several points in the video Hambly stops to give advice to parents or athletes who want to train without access to a volleyball court. This allows for driven athletes to get more training time in even when they can't get to a court. Additionally, his teaching is easy to understand, with terminology that anyone can understand. Finally advice on how to toss a volleyball for a hitter!

    Whether you're a coach, player or parent of a player, this video will be a useful tool in teaching and learning how to become an aggressive attacker while maintaining safe movement to prevent injury. Any coach, player or parent will feel very confident in their hitting training after watching this very detailed video.

    78 minutes. 2013.



    YVD-04346C:

    with Kevin Hambly,
    Stanford University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA National Champions!;
    2018 Pac-12 Volleyball Coach of the Year,
    2018 AVCA Pacific North Region Coach of the Year;
    former University of Illinois Head Coach;
    2011 NCAA Runners-up; 2011 Volleyball Magazine Coach of the Year

    Kevin Hambly has created a coach-, player-, and parent-friendly series that demonstrates efficient movement and controlled passing, and the methods to teach them. Coach Hambly has experienced college athletes demonstrate balanced, efficient posture and movement then teaches younger, less experienced players how to execute the same "Go Posture" and movements.

    Hambly takes the time to carefully explain, demonstrate and teach how to successfully move and execute controlled passes. He emphasizes these key points to both experienced and inexperienced players:

    • Begin in balanced, neutral "Go Posture" - Good posture makes it much easier to move to pass when starting with good posture
    • Initiate movement in any direction with body's center - This will help create a consistent passing platform
    • Face the line of the serve to pass from body's center - This gives the passer proper platform contact minimizing potential for passing errors
    • Act on the ball by initiating contact and finishing - The player acts on and controls the ball opposed to being acted on and controlled by the ball (or opponent)

    After laying a solid foundation or balanced movement and controlled passing, Hambly spends time with overhead passing for those advanced players ready to tackle the increased challenge.

    With each key, he takes the athletes through progressions that quickly get them passing with good form and accuracy. Each key is taught with singular focus. Hambly believes the athletes learn better by focusing on only one thing at a time. This singular focus allows for a more thorough understanding of each key. Points that are not mastered can be revisited at another time rather than making multiple corrections at one time. Developing movement patterns is extremely important so athletes don't have to think about technique when the ball is in play. Athletes will need a great many repetitions of these skills before they will become masters of their craft.

    As with the other videos in this series, Coach Hambly gives parent and players advice on how to train outside of the volleyball court, as well as tips for initiating the ball so that drill work can be as efficient and effective as possible. Hambly's easy, conversational style makes this video a benefit for coaches and athletes of all skill levels. Simple keywords and phrases for each key are valuable for the beginning coach or a parent helping their athlete improve.

    Have you ever watched a team that passed nearly every serve to target, nearly every hit to make it playable, and thought, "I wish my team passed like that". This video will train you and your players to do exactly that and frustrate all other teams you play.

    115 minutes. 2013.



    YVD-04346D:

    with Kevin Hambly,
    Stanford University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA National Champions!;
    2018 Pac-12 Volleyball Coach of the Year,
    2018 AVCA Pacific North Region Coach of the Year;
    former University of Illinois Head Coach;
    2011 NCAA Runners-up; 2011 Volleyball Magazine Coach of the Year

    Everyone knows "how to serve", but do they know how to serve correctly? Kevin Hambly has created a coach-, player-, and parent-friendly series to show how successful serving can be taught, learned and practiced efficiently.

    As he moves from skill to skill, Coach Hambly has his experienced players show how it is done and then he brings in younger players who are being taught the skills for the first time. He actually teaches these young players on the spot and then shows how to correct some parts of the movements with them until they are doing everything correctly. Time and again Coach Hambly emphasizes that coaches teaching skills should allow for singular focus during drills and players wanting to achieve advanced skill levels must put in the time to get the high number of reps to reach their goal.

    Acknowledging that his athletes are at different levels and have different strengths, Hambly lays basic serving foundation then progresses players through a variety of advanced serves based on their own strengths and skill levels including:

    • Standing Float
    • Jump Float
    • Jump Slide Float
    • Jump Top Spin

    Hambly emphasizes the same key points to all players regardless of skill level:

    • Start slow - finish fast
    • Use bow and arrow form
    • Finish to target
    • Make good hand contact
    • Drive through

    After teaching sound serving technique, players go through various drills to work strategic serving be hitting target zones, moving passers side-to-side, and moving passers short and deep. Having the ability to make passers move into each other and towards sidelines can increase the potential for serve receive errors or force your opponent into out-of-system situations. Coach Hambly wraps up by reiterating that players wanting to become skilled servers have to put the time in to achieve their goal.

    Whether you're a coach, player or even parent of a player, this video will prove helpful in achieving serving goals!

    46 minutes. 2013.



    YVD-04346E:

    with Kevin Hambly,
    Stanford University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA National Champions!;
    2018 Pac-12 Volleyball Coach of the Year,
    2018 AVCA Pacific North Region Coach of the Year;
    former University of Illinois Head Coach;
    2011 NCAA Runners-up; 2011 Volleyball Magazine Coach of the Year

    In this edition of the AAU Volleyball Skills Series, Kevin Hambly teaches coaches, athletes, and parents how they can improve individual defensive skills. In an easy to understand style, Coach Hambly takes both college athletes and young players through a series of drill progressions that will improve the defense of any level player. Listen in as he corrects technique in each drill; you will learn what to watch for as you teach and train your athletes.

    In the first section of the video, Hambly introduces the "go posture," a ready position that takes the pressure off the back and allows athletes to move quickly and effectively to any ball. He begins every drill with catching the ball instead of passing; if you can't catch it, you can't dig it! As athletes become adept at the movement, they begin to dig the ball. The key to effective training is to progress from easy to hard.

    The beginning drills have the athletes working stationary, but they are quickly moving to the ball in the next level. When movement is entered in, you will learn to teach your athletes to get their center to the ball, initiate contact and then finish the dig to get the ball high and create a swing.

    Each progression cycles back and reinforces elements from the previous drill before adding more complex skills. Coach Hambly also shares ways less experienced coaches or parents can enter the ball in drill so that athletes still get maximum value out of their training time. Accuracy in the toss or hit helps athletes to be successful.

    In the final segment, more advanced individual defensive techniques are covered. From extension moves to overhead digging, this section will help prepare experienced athletes for higher levels of play.

    Create a defense that is relentless and gives your team the best opportunity of scoring. A tough defense will beat a good offense nearly all the time, so wouldn't you want the best chance to go undefeated?

    83 minutes. 2013.



    YVD-04346F:

    with Kevin Hambly,
    Stanford University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA National Champions!;
    2018 Pac-12 Volleyball Coach of the Year,
    2018 AVCA Pacific North Region Coach of the Year;
    former University of Illinois Head Coach;
    2011 NCAA Runners-up; 2011 Volleyball Magazine Coach of the Year

    This is the ultimate tool for any coach looking to train a player to be a libero. Kevin Hambly has created the perfect video to teach the role and skills of the libero to coaches, parents and athletes. Coach Hambly breaks down the role of the libero, explaining the importance of footwork, using your center of gravity, making a correct platform, moving around the court and keeping your distance from the net.

    He starts by explaining the "go posture" and the importance of the athlete starting in this stance. He progresses them into moving side to side, catching the ball and then bumping it. He shows a proper platform and then shows how to correct the younger players. He moves on to the skills of digging, overhand digging, passing and setting. Hambly provides various tips for liberos and goes through several advanced but critical skills:

    • Double Down Dig
    • Shin Dig
    • Overhand Dig
    • Set

    Coach Hambly talks about coverage, the role of the libero on a team, and how to identify the best player for the libero position. He covers every aspect of being a libero in easy to understand segments that are easy to understand and master.

    As he moves from skill to skill, Coach Hambly has his experienced players show how it is done and then he brings in younger players who are being taught the skills for the first time. He actually teaches these young players on the spot and then shows how to correct some parts of the movements with them until they are doing everything correctly. Time and again Coach Hambly emphasizes that coaches teaching skills should allow for singular focus during drills and players wanting to achieve advanced skill levels must put in the time to get the high number of reps to reach their goal.

    This video will help you identify a player in your system who would best fit the libero role and it gives you all the skills to train her/him properly.

    75 minutes. 2013.



    YVD-04346G:

    with Kevin Hambly,
    Stanford University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA National Champions!;
    2018 Pac-12 Volleyball Coach of the Year,
    2018 AVCA Pacific North Region Coach of the Year;
    former University of Illinois Head Coach;
    2011 NCAA Runners-up; 2011 Volleyball Magazine Coach of the Year

    2011 Volleyball Magazine Coach of the Year Kevin Hambly provides step-by-step instruction for teaching and practicing effective blocking. This instruction is geared to the athlete, coach and parent

    Give your blocker a chance to score off of every hit, even if you have shorter blockers!

    Coach Hambly breaks it down into its most simple components; footwork, arm work, and eye work. His ability to break down each aspects into smaller parts allows a coach at any level teach and learn what to watch for on blockers to be more successful. He goes through each key of blocking by using the older players to demonstrate, and uses younger players to actually show how he teaches the skill.

    In this video, Coach Hambly demonstrates various hand positions and arm movements and when to teach and use each. Arm movement may need to vary based on player strength and skill level, and hand position can vary based on attack angle to put up the most effective block possible. Hambly also emphasizes the importance of involving the body's core for solid blocking movements.

    Once the foundation has been laid with good posture, hand position, arm movement and core involvement, Hambly progresses players through various footwork patterns. Developing strong skills in different footwork sequences provides players with the tools to get on the attacker efficiently regardless of their location along the net.

    Once they have base movements and footwork mastered, Hambly has players progress through drills to work various other aspects of blocking such as:

    • Soft block
    • Eye sequence
    • Independent arms

    The skills demonstrated in this video will help coaches, players and even parents of players in teaching and learning how to become an effective blocker regardless of skill level or size. Add this one to your library today!

    84 minutes. 2013.




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    VD-05010A: with Bond Shymansky,
    University of Iowa Head Coach;
    former Marquette University Head Coach; 2013 Big East Champs;
    former Georgia Tech Head Volleyball Coach; 2004 ACC Coach of the Year

    University of Iowa head volleyball coach, Bond Shymansky, guides you through the process of creating moments in practice that your players will see repeatedly in match play to prepare them to make adjustments on the fly, play as a cohesive unit, and win points for your team.

    Coach Shymansky walks you through the basics of four defensive systems: perimeter, middle, right up, and rotation. He highlights the strengths and weakness of each defense. Along with his University of Iowa team, Coach Shymansky demonstrates the situations your team will face while playing each defense and what to look for when making in-game switches between different systems.

    Blocking Scenarios

    You'll develop an understanding of what the blockers' responsibilities are in the defensive systems and how the defense behind them will adjust. Coach Shymansky explains how the defense adjusts when there is a hole in the block due to the blocker being late or not getting there at all. This happens a lot in games, and if your team is prepared for the situation, they will be more likely to get a dig and run an offense off of it.

    Transition Movement

    Coach Shymansky covers transition from a dig and what a team should do if the blockers switch after an offensive attack. He answers the question, "How can we be prepared defensively to be dynamic even when they have control of a swing or an attack that we just made?"

    Swing Block Movement

    You will learn how to properly execute the swing block. Additionally, your players will discover what they need to do when they're late and how to make a good block movement so they can get their hands across the net. Coach Shymansky demonstrates a one-foot crossover swing block that is used when the blocker is going to be late. You will also learn how to get the rest of the defense to react to the blockers.

    Installation of Defenses During Games

    Discover valuable ways to make a defensive system change in the middle of a set. Coach Shymansky explains how the use of hand signals and verbal cues can be used to change defenses in the middle of a match, so players know when and how to change and everyone's on the same page.

    Installation of Blocking Schemes

    Coach Shymansky explains what the different blocking schemes are and when to utilize them in the middle of a match. He covers the commit block, spread block and bunch read block. You'll learn when to make pre-service adjustments based on the opponent's rotation, hot hitter or go-to hitter, which will help your team get better prepared to block. Coach Shymansky also covers what middles need to do, how they communicate with the back row and what back row adjustments need to be made defensively.

    Defending the Back Row Attack

    One of the most confusing philosophies in volleyball is how to defend the back row attack. Coach Shymansky gives an explanation on how to defend it and explains the duties of the front row and the duties of the back and how they differ from normal defense.

    Everyone has heard the phrase defense wins championships. The philosophies and tips in this video will help your team's defense get you more points.

    "I have been looking for something like this for a long time. This is something that I have been missing as a coach and I can guarantee many varsity and college coaches will feel the same way. This is an easy to follow and understand hand book of team dynamic defense." - Customer Review

    74 minutes. 2016.



    VD-05010B: with Bond Shymansky,
    University of Iowa Head Coach;
    former Marquette University Head Coach; 2013 Big East Champs;
    former Georgia Tech Head Volleyball Coach; 2004 ACC Coach of the Year

    Bond Shymansky breaks down the components you need to have a more explosive offense. It all starts with ball control of the passers, arc points and tempo of the setters, and speed and power of the hitters. For a team to be more explosive, they need to attack out of more zones at multiple tempos. Coach Shymansky shows all the net zones - from zone 1 to 9 - for each hitter to attack. Additionally, he covers transition from defense to offense for each front row player.

    First Contact Ball Control

    See what is needed from the first contact in order to run an explosive offense. Coach Shymansky covers two main points: Pass height and where the setter should take the ball in relation to the net and their body. He focuses on the arc point of the pass and what is necessary to keep a fast tempo, as well as how to push tempo and make your technique explosive.

    First Contact Speed

    Coach Shymansky introduces three types of transition footwork for hitters. The goal is to get hitters to be explosive off the net. You will learn how to teach efficient transitional footwork for left side, right side and middles hitters that is precise and explosive.

    Arm Swing

    With his players, Coach Shymansky demonstrates the mechanics of the proper arm swing. This detail is often overlooked by coaches. The misconception is if a player is hitting hard, they must have a proper arm swing. However, a hard hitter may not be using a swing that will allow for an explosive offense.

    Hitting Position

    You will learn the different types of attacks each hitter can run in an explosive offense. Coach Shymansky demonstrates the different hitting options for left, right and middle hitters. You'll learn different tempos of hits and hits from different locations on the net. Coach Shymansky even shows where hitters should take off from.

    In order for an offense to be explosive, teams must work the different net zones and different tempos. Moving along the net zones for attacks will give hitters a 1-on-1 situation they can exploit. Multiple types of attacks are provided from each zone on the net.

    Serve Receive

    Learn how to have plays prepared when a good pass out of serve receive takes place. Coach Shymansky explains five combo plays. In each combo play, he explains who your team should try to pick on defensively, where you can get kills from, and which blockers you should try to put pressure on.

    Transition

    Learn how to run an explosive offense out of transition. This is valuable in the middle of a rally when your team gets a free ball or a perfect dig out of defense. Coach Shymansky covers how the play should be called and who should be calling it.

    All coaches want their offense to be more explosive and complicated to defend. This video will help give you an understanding of how to control the tempo of a game by developing technical components and system components and then tailoring them to your best situational coaching.

    "I have been a coach for 14 years. Been to the state final four 4 times and found this video so helpful." - Customer Review

    66 minutes. 2016.



    VD-05010C: with Bond Shymansky,
    University of Iowa Head Coach;
    former Marquette University Head Coach; 2013 Big East Champs;
    former Georgia Tech Head Volleyball Coach; 2004 ACC Coach of the Year

    How well do you prepare for tight sets in the 20s?

    A team that has a well-prepared plan has a much better chance to carry it out and get the win during the most crucial part of a match - the last five points. Bond Shymansky explains his philosophies of how to win a match when both teams score in the 20s. He goes into great detail on how to game plan, organize your offense, how to react to losing a point or bad calls, game management and more.

    Expectations

    You'll learn what a coach and player should expect when preparing for crunch time of a set. Knowing your team's thresholds and limitations is crucial. Coach Shymansky explains:

    • What coaches need to know about their players
    • What players need to know about themselves
    • Why players need to know what is expected of them

    How to React to Losing a Point or a Bad Call by the Referee

    This is a situation that needs to be rehearsed in practice. Coach Shymansky discusses how to react when there's a bad call, as well as what the floor captain and coaching staff should do to get ready for the next point. He discusses how players need to react and how to train reactions in practice. Additionally, you'll get strategies on how to handle a player after they commit an error in the 20s, and what to do in team huddles after points are won or lost.

    Identifying the "Serial Killer"

    Identifying the "serial killer" (go-to player) is important when closing out a game. Your setter should know who to feed and who will give the team the best chance to score points. Coach Shymansky goes over what that player's mindset needs to be and the rest of the team as well. He also covers what needs to be done to prepare to defend the opponent's serial killer.

    Scripting Plays

    Discover the importance of scripting plays so your team is prepared to score points during crunch time. Coach Shymansky covers different scenarios and how to prepare your team for them. He explains examples of what to do on free balls, when there is a mismatch, and how to communicate this information to players during the match.

    Tempo

    You'll learn how to recognize the tempo your team is playing at. Coach Shymansky explains how to make changes when your teams tempo slows down and the positive and negative effects of slow and fast tempo play.

    Game Management

    Prepare yourself as a coach to win the last five points of a set. Being prepared can help you react and make the right decisions to help your team win. Coach Shymansky discusses:

    • How to act and react
    • How to monitor how you act and react
    • How to practice timeouts in crucial parts of the game
    • Sub management
    • How to use subs to slow the other team down
    • How to use subs as a strategy piece to give instructions and feedback to your players

    Sometime you win or lose a point in crucial times, but knowing how to react to a bad call, great kill or service error will prepare your team to be ready for the next point.

    44 minutes. 2016.




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    with Dan Fisher,
    University of Pittsburgh Head Coach;
    2017 & 2018 ACC Coach of the Year; 2017 & 2018 ACC Champions;
    AVCA East Coast Region - Coach of the Year - 2017, 2018;
    Head Coach for the US Women's National Team/Pan Am Games- in 2015 (Gold Medal) & 2016 (Bronze);
    former Concordia -Irvine University Head Coach,
    2012 NAIA National Championship (perfect 38-0 record), National Runner-Up finish in 2011; NAIA/AVCA National Coach of the Year (2011)

    This in-depth video from 2017 ACC Coach of the Year Dan Fisher is a two-part video providing both the philosophy behind aggressive offensive play and the methodology of instilling this mindset in your program and players.

    In the first segment, Fisher provides statistical and video analysis to compare aggressive and non-aggressive play. He examines mindfulness training and the process of overcoming the fear of failure to reach a growth mentality.

    The second segment of the video moves into the gym, where Fisher demonstrates drills to train hitters on adjusting their approach, leading to an expanded range of attack. He examines the idea of corresponding approaches based on passes and sets to take an aggressive swing on a higher percentage of balls. The drills progress to 6-on-6 play, rewarding players for hard-hitting attacks.

    Chalk Talk

    Coach Fisher shares his philosophical background using many slides and stats during the first hour of the video. He provides a different method of keeping track of errors and free balls, while showing how he twists the coaching terms to help improve his team huddles during timeouts and after games.

    During the chalk talk session of Fisher's presentation, you'll see slides, sample videos, and stats that detail:

    • What makes Pitt volleyball different from other programs
    • How Fisher defines offensive aggressiveness
    • How Coach Fisher developed his style
    • The science behind winning and losing
    • The problems behind only focusing on the positives

    On The Court

    Coach Fisher demonstrates multiple drills that encourage quick footwork to the ball and exercises that take away the fear of failure when playing aggressively. You'll get:

    • An in-depth look at the four step approach with a focus of getting under the ball
    • Step close drills to train your players to go in any direction with their approach
    • Butterfly drills that touch on a wide range of swings

    By drilling your players to focus on getting their feet to the ball, they will develop a wider range in their offensive play. Throughout this video, Fisher reiterates that when players have a wider range, they will be comfortable swinging at any ball in any situation.

    Also included are five drills specifically designed to help hitters become more aggressive:

    • High Hands
    • Line Shots
    • Shove
    • Swing for the Daylight
    • Tap and Cover

    Coach Fisher does an excellent job explaining all of his drills and their benefits. He also breaks down the correlation between a player's mindset and their aggressiveness on the court. This video encompasses all aspects of implementing an aggressive offensive system in your program!

    100 minutes. 2018.


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    with Cliff Hastings,
    Parkland College Head Coach;
    Back-to-Back NJCAA DII National Champions (2015-16) - finished a perfect 57-0 in 2015;
    Back-to-Back NJCAA DII National Champion Runner-up (2013-14); 8x Mid-West Athletic Conference Champions (2009-16);
    Director of the Prime Time Volleyball Club (IL)

    Cliff Hastings has amassed an impressive .905 winning percentage in nearly a decade as the head coach at Parkland College. His efforts led to back-to-back NJCAA D-II National Championships in 2015 & 2016 (following back-to-back NJCAA D-II National Championship runner-ups in 2013 & 2014) and it's clear that Hastings knows what it takes to build a winning program.

    In this video, you'll see Coach Hastings cover his essentials for team defense. He focuses on back row play, collaborative drills, and improving control to help you boost the effectiveness of your team in the defensive portion of the game.

    Back Row Position Qualities

    Each back-row position is unique such that the outside positions move forward and backward most frequently while the middle-back defender performs more side-to-side movements. We should put our players in the back-row position that they are most likely to succeed in. You'll see Coach Hastings cover a number of topics, including:

    • Why it's important for coaches to know their players and to understand the best way to use them effectively in the back row.
    • Warm-ups that include segments where players pass the ball while moving forward and backward. Alternatively, they can focus on the side-to-side skill that is needed from the middle-back position.
    • The Shuffle Passing drill, which is used to focus on footwork and maintaining good body control.
    • Having players self-evaluate the skills being taught and putting them into practical game-like situations to improve performance and skill level.
    • The Knee-pad drill, which is used to make sure players pass with the chest up, hips forward and in a neutral position at impact.

    6-on-6 Collaborative Drills

    With this video, you will learn how to incorporate collaborative drills into your team practices to gain a clear picture of what you should cover the most with your defense. Too often, coaches lose sight of the simple things when they go into attack mode and miss out on making the little changes needed to be successful in defending every aspect of an offense. You will see:

    • The Backpedal drill, which is used to force the passer to exit the court after a good pass by backpedaling.
    • The 6-on-6 Setter Dump drill, in which points are scored only when the setter dumps the ball untouched to the other side of the net. This is a great way to observe how well a defense moves to the ball on setter dumps.
    • Ways to decide which defense to run and who does what on defense in a variety of conditions.
    • The 6-on-6 Overpass drill that allows teams to focus on where they should position themselves in the event of an overpass.

    Control Drills

    Control drills will allow you to see and coach a ton of defense. Coach Hastings guides you through how to build a high-caliber defense and shows:

    • How a coach or manager can fill the 6-person role to run the collaborative drills when your team is short on players.
    • Why blocking middle hitters isn't a 'cookie cutter' approach. Coaches need to understand which offensive players are most effective and how to play defense with the percentages. For instance, if an offense has a good weakside hitter, you may want to cheat the double-block in that direction.

    When coaching volleyball, it's important to understand the considerations for establishing a team defense. This video from Coach Hastings will guide you through a systematic approach to incorporating collaborative drills and skills into your practice regimen.

    60 minutes. 2019.


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    with Ryan McGuyre,
    Baylor University Head Women's Volleyball Coach;
    2017 Big 12 Coach of the Year; Back-to-back-to-back NCAA Tournaments in '16, '17, '18 (first time in school history!);
    former Cal Baptist University Men's & Women's Head Coach;
    9x National Champions; NCCAA Division I National Coach of the Year (2011);
    Named AVCA's Men's & Women's NAIA National Coach of the Year in the same year (2010)

    In this video, Baylor University head coach Ryan McGuyre covers the fundamentals needed for coaches to get their players to become more dynamic attackers. This includes working on more deceptive and effective shots that will result in a higher kill percentage for your attackers.

    Concepts Critical to Attacking

    The foundation for the attack begins with proper footwork. Coach McGuyre teaches how footwork should look from small, to big, to even bigger steps and from a slow, to faster, to fastest pace. The first step begins when the ball is in the setter's hands. Once players can repeat the correct footwork, they can look at the double arm lift. While teaching the double arm lift, coaches should see relaxed arms out in front, then back by the player's side, and finally up by their side.

    Through a series of progressive drills, McGuyre takes you through the process of training your hitters in the fundamentals of attacking, as well as some higher-level drills on how to become a more deceptive hitter. Some of the principles that Coach McGuyre teaches to make your players more dynamic hitters include:

    • Elevate - Learn to hit over the block.
    • Annihilate - Power the ball through the block.
    • Locate - Find the open spot on the court.
    • Variate - Change up your hitting locations.
    • Humiliate - Don't allow blocker to read your attack.

    Hitting Techniques

    McGuyre teaches the elements of attacking the ball with precision. The cut is performed with a thumbs-up attack that works well for hitting down the line on an outside attack. The wrist away works in opposition to the line shot and is an effective tool for an outside hitter used to scramble up the defenders. One way to incorporate the cut and wrist away attacks is to use only these two attacking methods during practice sessions.

    Whether your team is big or small, it's essential for your hitters to have a full bag of shots from which to choose. McGuyre teaches how to help your hitters better understand the little things they can do to improve their dynamic attacks. There are many ways to attack the ball and part of being a dynamic attacker is being able to draw upon all of these hitting tools in combination.

    Practice Drills

    Finally, you'll see McGuyre break his athletes into three equal teams with a Queen of the Court concept, rotating after sideouts. The Jungle Ball drill requires attackers to only use pre-named attack techniques. This blocked training creates game-like situations for hitters to work on being more dynamic. The final round of Jungle Ball includes a "Whatever it Takes" segment where the attacker can use their whole bag of shots to create a dynamic offense. This is a great way to challenge attackers to tool the block, to be unpredictable and to work on all of their attack skills.

    When coaching volleyball, it's important to understand the full range of attacking skills that can be taught. This video from Coach McGuyre is a great reference for any coach who wants to improve the details of attacking for their team!

    59 minutes. 2019.


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    with Bond Shymansky, University of Iowa Head Coach;
    former Marquette University Head Coach; 2013 Big East Champs;
    former Georgia Tech Head Volleyball Coach; 2004 ACC Coach of the Year

    Developing young volleyball players requires quality reps and touches in a practice. Many videos give you a lot of drills, but in High Energy, High Rep Practice Drills, Bond Shymansky also delivers the when, the why, and the strategy behind each drill.

    These drills will create a practice atmosphere that will increase your players' volleyball IQ, maintain high energy, maximize ball touches and increase the competitiveness of your team.

    Warm Up Drills

    "Triangle Pepper," an alternative to two-player pepper, trains players to defend, set, and hit at game-like angles and it replicates game-like movement and communication. "Cross-Net Pepper" will have your players working on communication, blocking, and covering the hitter - before practice even begins!

    Situational Drills and Games

    The true value of this video comes in the situational drills and games. These brilliant drills demonstrate how to teach specific offensive and defensive concepts while ratcheting up the level of competitiveness in the gym.

    Coach Shymansky shows you how he addresses all aspects of the game through his progression of drills, including:

    • Skill drills to train directional hitting and transition offense off of free balls, tips and attacks.
    • Situational drill sets that provide many repetitions in game-like situations.
    • Side-out drills that train effective performance in pressure situations.
    • Point-scoring drills that instill aggressiveness and reinforce scoring in bunches.
    • Goal-based drills to increase the "volleyball IQ" of your players.

    Competitive Drills and Games

    Run competitive drills and games that are fun and engaging for your players and simple to execute with as few as ten players and one coach. You'll learn how to make the drills more difficult as the team becomes comfortable with what they are doing and how Coach Shymansky uses the scoreboard during practice to mimic game situations. The scoring systems are easy to understand and there is always a clear winner.

    Without question this is one of the finest videos to date covering how to teach and encourage competitive play in the gym. With this arsenal of drills, you can run an efficient and effective practice that will effectively prepare your team for game time!

    This video was definitely 5 stars! I had a great time reviewing this one! My first day of practice with my team starts Monday, and I can't wait to incorporate some of the FANTASTIC drill and concepts I have learned looking at (this video)! - B. Davis, HS Volleyball Coach

    101 minutes. 2013.


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    with John Dunning,
    former Stanford University Head Women's Volleyball Coach;
    2016 NCAA National Champions - 5x National Championship Coach (2016, '04, '05 at Stanford, 1985-86 at Pacific);
    Distinguished member of the AVCA Hall of Fame (2011);
    2001 AVCA National Coach of the Year; 4x Pac-12 Coach of the Year; over 800 career wins

    Pull up a front row seat and watch John Dunning teach all aspects of volleyball! Explore the inner-workings of Dunning's time-tested and legendary system of success - and learn how you can incorporate it into your program!

    This extensive DVD set includes more than five hours of volleyball instruction, including six sessions over three days of practice. As an added bonus, experience Dunning's "freshman only session" that gives you a front row seat to the indoctrination process of transitioning athletes into the Stanford program.

    Practice Breakdown:
    Day 1:

    • Freshman only session.
    • Practice 1 - Includes a skill set focus on passing, setting, middle footwork, and block and hit transition.
    • Practice 2 - Full team session includes intensive skill development, team defense, and introduction of the offense.

    Day 2:

    • Practice 1 - Includes reading and passing form, ball control, footwork and blocking for middles, hitting from platforms, and much more.
    • Practice 2 - A more intense, physically demanding practice with numerous contacts to improve ball control.

    Day 3:

    • Practice 1 - A physically demanding practice that includes high repetitions of defensive movements and concepts.
    • Practice 2 - Scrimmaging. This practice is a dress rehearsal for game day. Dunning shares his tactics for incorporating scrimmages into practice to best simulate a game-day scenario.

    This DVD set covers nearly every facet of how John Dunning approaches teaching and playing the game. You will get an "all-access" look at how he teaches the skills, drills, and strategies that have earned him legendary coaching status!

    Order now and take the first step in integrating these proven techniques and coaching methods into your program!

    308 minutes (3 DVDs). 2011.

    All Access videos are designed to allow viewers from all over the world to see how successful coaches run their practices in a "live" practice setting. All Access videos allow viewers to see the practices un-edited and in real-time. You will see how top coaches run their drills, interact with their team and staff, how they motivate their team, the cue words they use, the atmosphere of the practice and how practices are structured from day to day. Many coaches visit successful colleges and high schools to watch practice. But if you live out of state or out of the country, visiting another coach's gym can be costly. That's why we created the All Access Practice Series of videos -- to bring the practices to you!


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